I am a theoretical linguist as well as a fieldworker. I am currently a Lecturer in Linguistics at the University of Manchester and an associated researcher at the Tübingen Collaborative Research Center 833. I was trained at the Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen in Germany (from which I also received my Ph.D. in 2015), the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in the United States, and the University of British Columbia, Vancouver in Canada.

Broadly speaking, I investigate how meaning emerges from the interaction of syntactic structure, lexical information, composition principles and context. I am particularly interested in how far this interaction is subject to crosslinguistic variation, and in the repercussions of this variation for first language acquisition and processing.

Topics I haved worked on or am working on include the crosslinguistic representation of scalarity in the grammar, the acquisition of comparison constructions, the architecture of tense and modality at Logical Form, as well as the grammar of alternatives.


What’s New?

– Out this November in Journal of Semantics: Vera Hohaus & Malte Zimmermann (2020), “Comparisons of Equality With German SO…WIE, and the Relationship Between Degrees and Properties”.

– Published this November in Semantics & Pragmatics: Jozina Vander Klok & Vera Hohaus (2020), “Weak Necessity without Weak Possibility: The Composition of Modal Strength Distinctions in Javanese”.

– I received one of the Outstanding Staff Awards for Teaching, Learning and Student Experience by the Faculty of Humanities for the 2019-20 academic year. Read the Manchet blog post here!

– Out now in Cognitive Science, joint work with Petra Augurzky & Rolf Ulrich (2020, “Context and Complexity in Incremental Sentence Interpretation: An ERP Study on Temporal Quantification”.

– Check out these two fabulous short stories in Samoan, which are now available through print-on-demand here. Both are based on storyboards from The Fieldwork Hub.

– Out now in the Annual Review of Linguistics: Vera Hohaus & M. Ryan Bochnak (2020), “The Grammar of Degree: Gradability across Languages“.